Edward Robinson’s ‘The Orion Code’ Review: A 100% Scam And Here’s Why

This review will without doubt reveal to you the dark under-current that exists within the world of making money online.

By that I don’t mean your attempts to make money online…I mean other people attempting to make money online FROM you.


Let me explain, and please bear with me…

A couple of weeks ago I reviewed a product called “Quantum Code”. It turned out to be a scam and I wanted to make sure my visitors were aware of the tactics it was using.

Here’s a screenshot of the video on the Quantum Code website:


Before I go any further, I ask that you please take a look at my review of The Quantum Code. Trust me…you will soon realize why it’s important.

Click here to read my review of Quantum Code (opens in a new window)

It doesn’t matter if you found this post by searching for The Orion Code, Quantum Code or you were just browsing my website and happened upon this post.

You are about to discover the lengths that some folks will go to in their attempts to trick you out of your hard earned cash.


When I joined the Quantum Code to create my review on October 4th, I was surprised that I didn’t receive any follow up emails.

Then today, I received 8 emails in one hit from the Quantum Code team.

They all stated that I had $15,000 waiting and to collect the payment I had to watch a webinar.


Obviously intrigued, I followed the link to the webinar.

Here’s where it sent me…


Now I’m sure you will agree…this looks VERY similar to the Quantum Code video above. Even the dialog is the same!

I’m not going to drag this out or complicate things further. The Orion Code is a COMPLETE and exact rip of the Quantum Code.

The emails are not sending me to a webinar to collect my $15,000…they are sending me to a recreated version of their scam.


This review could well be one of the easiest that I have ever written.

There’s no need for me to explain the Orion Code process because it’s exactly the same as the Quantum Code process. Here’s what both products try to do…

  • Trick you into thinking you will earn $100,000’s without spending a dime.
  • Attempt to convince you that you do not need experience to make it work.
  • Trick you into thinking there are only 20 spots available.
  • Only to tell you there are only 2 spots available.
  • Once you submit your details to try it for free, you are told to invest a minimum of $250 to the preferred binary trading broker.

Just to prove the similarities, let me show you a few screenshots from the Orion Code video. Here’s Edward Robinson taking a private jet to the Orion Code headquarters:


And here’s Michael Crawford taking a private jet to the Quantum Code Headquarters. Note that the script is identical.


Isn’t that uncanny?  At least Edward has more headroom than Michael had :-)

Next up I discovered a schoolboy error on a Hollywood blockbuster scale…


Antony, (Sergay’s equivalent from the Quantum Code), describes the technology behind the Orion Code. He calls it…“NQS”.

He goes on to explain what “NQS” stands for…



Is he maybe thinking…“Near Quantum Speed”?


Moving forward through the video there are even more similarities. If you’ve read my review of Quantum Code, you will also know that Michael contacted 3 beta tester users to check on their progress.

It turns out those same 3 people, Robert, Mark and Cindy, ALSO tried the Orion Code!

And just like last time, it would seem that Cindy from South Africa is too busy spending her earnings to take a call from Edward and the Orion Code team.


The Orion Code video follows the exact same path as the Quantum Code. Eventually you are asked to hand over your contact details and claim one of the 20 spots available.

When you do, you are taken to a page where Edward is waiting with some really important news.


This all seems more than familiar. What was it that happened at the exact same stage with the Quantum Code?

Oh yeah, I remember…


Yep, it’s identical.

Edward shares the exact same good/bad news that Michael shared in the Quantum Code video. The system is working 3 times more powerful than expected, and there are now only 2 spots available.

You are then asked to hand your details over once again, including your phone number. Edward then provides another video where he shows you how to activate your account.


And there we go. After using pressure tactics throughout the video and insisting that you don’t have to pay a dime, Edward now reveals that you cannot use the Orion Code system unless you hand over at least $250.


You don’t need me to tell you that the Orion Code is a complete replica of the Quantum Code.

The process is exactly the same, using different actors, same script and a re-shoot of the original video.

There is no doubt that the same person or same team of people are behind both of these programs. They have re-invented their scam. But why?

 What follows is purely my opinion, but I think it will go a long way to explaining how murky these waters really are.


First of all, the Quantum Code website started in June 2016. Using one of my research tools, I have spotted what might have been a problem for the people behind the Quantum Code:


In the last month, the average amount of time a visitor spends on the Quantum Code website is just 4 seconds.

This is fantastic news! It means that nearly everyone visiting the website is leaving quickly and not seeing the video through to the end and handing over money they can’t afford to lose.

I would imagine this created something of a problem for the Quantum Code team.

They bankrolled a Hollywood-style video to convince people to hand over their cash, but it looks like it didn’t work.

Why didn’t it work?

I’m guessing that is was due to the standard of acting in the video.

I believe the creators had no choice but to re-shoot it with different actors and a more convincing lead man. The actor playing Edward Robinson in the Orion Code video certainly appears to be more relaxed in his role.

To make this work they would also have to re-launch the program under a different name.

Using my research tools to analyze the Orion Code website, I get some interesting data on the effectiveness of their efforts:


The Orion Code website launched in August of this year, and the average visitor stay is now at over 24 minutes. That’s a win for the people behind the product, and bad news for people who end up on their website.

Further investigation of the website reveals that it is hosted in the Netherlands. This isn’t hugely important, but it does suggest that it is being run from Europe.


Something else I noticed was that the Orion Code team went to great lengths to cover up the origin of the videos being used on their website. After some digging around, I was able to find where it came from:


The videos used by the Orion Code website are all linked to a Youtube account listed as being owned by Douglas Harrod. Check out the red arrow above.

I would be VERY surprised if this guy is real. Who would put their name and picture on an account that is attempting to scam people? My guess is, the Orion Code creators have set up a fake account with a fake name and picture.

Actually, they have. Thanks to a reverse image search on Google, the photo actually belongs to an award-winning historian and author:


I’ve emailed this guy to let him know that his image is being used to promote a scam product.


Ok, so I think we can now safely say that the Orion Code and the Quantum Code have been created by the same person or people.

Both programs are designed to get you to part with a minimum of $250, even though you are told it is completely free.

The creator(s) reacted very quickly when the initial Quantum Code version didn’t work. They shot a brand new video and renamed the product. They are in the business of professionally deceiving people.

My advice would be to not give ANY of your details to either the Orion Code or Quantum Code websites. They will both take your money without hesitation.

I have a hunch that they will soon re-invent the product again once the truth about the Orion Code gets greater exposure. I ask that you share this post socially so that everyone in your personal network is made aware of what is going on.


There’s no getting away from the fact that online scams are VERY real. It saddens me that some people will go to incredible lengths to trick you out of your money.

This review is unfortunately just one example of what happens online every single day.

People DO fall for scams like this – often because they are in desperate need of some extra cash.

But the scammers out there have NO concerns over the consequences that you face when you hand money over to them.

Stay safe online people. If you are EVER in doubt about an opportunity to make money online, check my tips on how to avoid scams online or even send me an email and I will look into it for you.

I will sign off by stating the obvious one more time…

The Orion Code will not make you rich…it will only make you a LOT poorer. keep your money safely in your pocket.

Marcus – WFHW

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestEmail this to someone
Click Here to Leave a Comment Below
Todd - October 26, 2016 Reply

Thanks, Marcus. I took time to Google this, and found your review. I got taken in by this scam a few days ago, for $950, and I don’t know what to do.

I am a Disabled American Veteran who recently had to stop working because of severe degenerative Arthritis in my left shoulder, so I was scrambling to find a way to make money, and get out of debt. I was knocked out from behind and stabbed 55 times on my Naval Base back in 1986, and lived through it. Well, after going through a very rough time recovering from that (including PTSD, anxiety/depression, and other things), I started looking online to open a home based business, and went into so much debt that I had to file bankruptcy a few years ago.

I am now in such deep depression, after being taken again by the Orion Code “system” I’ll share below just a few days ago, for $950 (they only asked for an initial $250 investment), but I put my foolish faith in them and almost maxed out my credit card with $950). I’m in dire straights right now, deep depression like I’ve never been in before because of it. But, at least I found your review, and will follow what you have to say about online scams now.

These thieves do have a seared or no conscience whatsoever, no doubt, and it really is sad that they are into just ruining peoples lives, and it does not bother them at all. Again, I don’t know what I’m going to do now, as I am hurt very, very badly here by these guys, but am glad I found your review this time. Thank you! Oh yeah, they then had a so called “broker” call me, and actually tried to get me to invest $10,000 more! I told them I was on the verge of suicide for what they have done to me now.

    Marcus - October 26, 2016 Reply

    Todd, I am at a loss as to what to say here. I am so sorry that you fell victim to the Orion Code.

    First things first I would suggest that you contact the broker you joined through when signing up for the Orion Code, either by email or phone and demand a full refund. DO NOT let them talk you round.

    Also contact your credit card company and ask them to block any future attempts to take money from your card. Explain that you are the victim of a nasty online scam.

    If you don’t mind me saying I would also like to advise that you seek medical assistance for how this has made you feel.

    Here a couple of online resources that I hope might be of some help to you:



    Although $950 is a huge amount of money to lose, there might well be a chance that you can get it back. And if there is a plus side it’s that they didn’t take any more money from you.

    I wish you well, Todd. It would be great to hear back from you once everything is sorted out.

    All the best,

    Marcus – WFHW

Chris - October 25, 2016 Reply

Wow! Thanks man, for this vital info. Was about to give in my details but pause to do a little research online and came across your wonderful work done…. It really helps.. Thanks once again.

    Marcus - October 26, 2016 Reply

    You are welcome, Chris, and well done for doing your research before taking things a step further.

    All the best,

    Marcus – WFHW

steven - October 24, 2016 Reply

this is serious , thanks very much Marcus

    Marcus - October 24, 2016 Reply

    You are welcome, Steven.

    Yep…just proves what goes on within the online world.

    Glad it helped!

    Marcus – WFHW

samson - October 22, 2016 Reply

I have submitted my master card details,in short all details requested submitted,what is going to happen to my bank account?

    Marcus - October 23, 2016 Reply

    Hi Samson,

    I suggest contacting Mastercard and checking if any amounts have been taken. If so, ask them to block any further unauthorized payments from your account.

    You might also want to contact the broker that you joined when starting the process and asking for them for a full refund.

    I hope this helps,

    Marcus – WFHW

Bruce Hopkins - October 21, 2016 Reply

Great job, Marcus! Thank you for the excellent investigative work.

marouane the moroccan - October 21, 2016 Reply

thank you very much for your effort and warning.

    Marcus - October 21, 2016 Reply

    You are welcome, Marouane.

    Glad to hear it was of some help to you.

    All the best,

    Marcus – WFHW

Leave a Comment: